Posted by Mary Lou Buckley on 7/29/2018

You can ask any homeowner-buying and owning a home is expensive. Mortgage payments, property taxes, utilities, and other bills quickly add up.

If you want to buy a home but donít have a large down payment saved, odds are youíve discovered something called private mortgage insurance (PMI).

PMI is an extra monthly payment that you make (on top of your mortgage payment) when you donít have enough to make a large (20%) down payment on your home.

However, if you want to buy a home and donít want to tack on an extra monthly payment for PMI, you have options. In todayís post, Iím going to talk about some ways to avoid paying PMI on your mortgage so you can save more money in the long run.

PMI Basics

Before we talk about getting rid of PMI, letís spend a minute on what to expect when you do have to pay it.

PMI typically costs 0.30% to %1.15% of your total loan balance annually. That means that your PMI payments will decrease a moderate amount as you pay off your loan.

Furthermore, once you have paid off 22% of your loan, your PMI will be cancelled and youíll only be responsible for your regular monthly mortgage payments.

Getting PMI waived early

With conventional loans, you can request to have your PMI cancelled once youíve paid off 20% of the mortgage. However, many buyers with PMI are using some form of first-time buyer loan, such as an FHA loan.

With an FHA loan, youíll be stuck with PMI for the lifetime of the loan if you donít make a down payment of 10% or more. Thatís a lot of PMI payments, especially if you take out a 30 year loan, and it can quickly add up.

If you have an FHA loan with FHA insurance, the only way to cancel the insurance is to refinance into a non-FHA insured loan. And remember--refinancing has its own costs and complications.

Making it to the 20% repayment mark

On conventional loans, the best way to get rid of PMI is to reach your 20% repayment mark as soon as possible. That could mean aggressively paying off your mortgage until you reach that point.

This can be achieved by making extra payments, or just paying more each month. However, you donít want to neglect other debt that could be accruing costly interest in favor of paying off your loans. Make sure you do the math and find out which debt will be more expensive before neglecting other debt.

Once you do reach the 20% repayment mark, youíll have to remember to apply to have your PMI canceled with your lender. Otherwise, it will be canceled automatically at 22%.





Posted by Mary Lou Buckley on 3/15/2015

You saved all your money for a down payment on a house and calculated the costs of the mortgage but wait just a minute...owning a home also comes with several hidden costs. Those costs can†add up. So before you buy your home, here are additional home-related expenses youíll want to include in your budgeting: Real Estate Taxes Often your real estate taxes are included in your monthly mortgage payment but in some instances you may pay them directly. The amount of taxes you pay varies depending on the value of your homeís and the tax rate in your community. Private Mortgage Insurance Your monthly mortgage payment may also include PMI (private mortgage insurance). Lenders typically charge a PMI if your loan exceeds 80 percent of the sales price. Homeowners Insurance Most banks require that you hold homeowners insurance. Homeowner's insurance protects from damage to the home from things like fire, theft or weather. Just because you have insurance doesn't mean there are no costs to you remember to set aside your deductible. While owning a home does have hidden costs the gain of homeownership is always more than the cost.